Archive for the ‘trail’ Category

Fahnestock Spring

April 19, 2013

Two great ladies: give them a mess of markers and a hammer, the results …

Jane the nailer:

and Liz a tacks

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Hudson Trail: Working on signage for Clarence Fahnestock State Park

February 23, 2012

We are working on signage for entering and exiting the Clarence Fahnestock State Park and the Hudson Highlands State Park, where the Hudson trail overlays existing trails. We also are working on a possible new trail in and next to the Hudson Highlands State Park. Please join us for indoor (designing signs, blogging, Google Earth work) and outdoor work!
Here is a tentative draft of a sample sign. Please comment.

Sign for Hudson Trail on entering Fahnestock State Park

Hudson Trail in Clarence Fahnestock State Park

CommuniTyler Event

December 10, 2011

On December 3rd, as the NYC CommuniTyler
(http://communityler.org/index.html)
kickoff event, a group of 2 dozen New Yorkers, led by Kacey Ronaldson, worked with Friends of the Hudson Trail to do maintenance on a portion of the Old Croton Aqueduct used by the Hudson Trail.

communiTYler on the Hudson Trail

CommuniTYler helping out Hudson Trail / Old Croton Aqueduct


Branches were moved and garbage was carted out and a good time was had by all.

Game Changer: The Hudson Trail is Back

June 28, 2011

As you may know, the Hudson Trail is a project to build a long hiking trail from the High Bridge in NYC to Mt. Marcy in the Adirondacks. The strategy is to link together existing trails using public roads and right-of-ways. The trail is made up of 4 parts, we call treks: South Trek, Stissing Trek, the Bend Trek and North Trek (see the page About the Hudson Trail). Development was proceeding nicely. Officials, hikers and casual walkers told us that they appreciated our markers. However, something went wrong about two years ago. Our markers were torn down on and around the Old Croton Aqueduct, markers that people had told us were very helpful in making the connections on streets. NY State officials stopped communicating with us. We do not know the problem, but it may have been that we suffered from not being a formal group focused on a local project. We believed and still believe that our strategy of getting a whole trail marked and then working with local groups to improve it is a good one. We also did not want to compete for donations with existing groups, groups that we each belong to as individuals.

But something happened. Fourteen members of the New York State Assembly, led by Assemblyman Bob Castelli, 89th Assembly District, the district for Mt. Kisco where Bob Jessen resides, have written a letter to Commissioner Rose Harvey, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation, requesting action to rectify the situation and allow the Friends of the Hudson Trail to proceed.

Please contact us if you want to work on this project. The weather is beautiful. Let’s to out and build a trail.

letter, page 1
letter, page 1
letter, page 1

Update

August 16, 2009

Even though we toiled this unusual summer sporting umbrellas and cold weather gear, we have checked many of our original painted blazes. They are in great shape, due in no small part to the paint, disabled-parking blue.

We also did the indoor work using Google Earth to divide the trail into 36 sections, each estimated at a day’s walk, roughly 10 miles.  Please look at the updated About the Hudson Trail page at the upper right of the screen. Please comment.

Next generation

June 17, 2009

Bob took his grandson, a Cub Scout who lives in Florida, and other family, to Sunken Mine Road and to a side trail up Candlewood Hill for the 360 degree views. Here is Thor Gabriel putting up a marker.

National Trails Day 2009

June 10, 2009

Our group was small but lively and a good time was had by all. We saw many specimens of Natrix Sipedon (the Northern water snake) basking in the sun’s rays after a heavy rain: pictures of fauna and flora coming. Here is our photographer putting up a marker.

Lyndhurst

March 15, 2009

On a spring break day in March, we tramped on the Old Croton Aqueduct Trail through the Lyndhurst estate, now a National Historic Landmark. Our spanking new markers were put to the test as the broad field provided few trees for the task.

Here is a picture of a statue in front of the main building.
Statue at Lynhurst

Please comment if you can tell us who or what the statue represents.

Lyndhurst National Historic site from the Hudson Trail
West view. Notice the snowbells peeking up under the tree.
Looking up the Lyndhurst house
View from the south.

Marking Trail in Philipstown, NY

December 2, 2008

Jeanine and Headhood were working off a great turkey dinner cooked mainly by Aviva by painting telephone poles in Philipstown, NY.  Additional thrills were ours as we painted our markers through the former downtown area of McKeel’s Corners.  The buildings, all of them, were removed in the 1950s to make way for the widening of Routes 301 and 9 (aka Albany Post Road). The little white church shown in the video dates from the 1840s.  North on Route 9, the two-room brick school house has been boarded up for years.

Back on the Trail

November 14, 2008
sample plastic HT marker from the Voss Signs, Inc.

sample plastic HT marker from the Voss Signs, Inc.

Much campaign work, but now we are back at work on the Hudson Trail. In the meantime, Bob has put together a design for a trail marker with input from Jeanine, Elizabeth and Autumn and others. The order is in to Voss Signs.

We also explored and pushed the measuring wheel over a side trail called the Old Colaburgh Trail.

While waiting for final finishing up on the South Trek, we have started communications with Dutchess County Parks to begin marking the Stissing Trek.